Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery
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 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 50  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 148--152

First two bilateral hand transplantations in India (Part 1): From vision to reality


1 Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences, Kochi, Kerala, India
2 Department of Transplant co-ordinator, Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences, Kochi, Kerala, India

Correspondence Address:
Subramania Iyer
Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Tower 1, 4th Floor, Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences, AIMS Ponekkara P. O., Kochi - 682 041, Kerala
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijps.IJPS_93_17

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Introduction: Vascularized composite tissue allotransplantation is a relatively new concept, which was unavailable in the Indian subcontinent till a bilateral hand transplant was carried out successfully in January 2015. Materials and Methods: The setting up of the transplant programme involved obtaining legal clearances, creating public awareness, harnessing the institutional facilities, drawing up protocols, assembling the surgical team, managing immunological issues, rehabilitation and preparing the ancillary services. Results: Both, the first and second bilateral hand transplants were resounding successes with both the recipients getting back to their original daily routines. Conclusions: The organisation of the hand transplant programme was a large task, which necessitated intensive planning, and cooperation from various teams within and outside the institution. Exemplary team-work was the key to the phenomenal success of these path breaking endeavors in the subcontinent.






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